How Much Power Does Starlink Use?

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If you plan to use Starlink for your RV or off-grid cabin, knowing the electrical specifications for Starlink is critical. Even if are just using Starlink at home on the grid, you may be wondering how much power the Starlink dish uses.

In this article, I will explain the power consumption for all three models of the Starlink antenna: Standard/RV, High Performance, and the original round dish. I will also explain the factors that affect power consumption.

Standard and RV Starlink

The Standard Starlink hardware uses 50-75 watts on average. This includes the antenna, router, power supply, and cables.

When there is no network activity, the Standard Starlink uses about 20 watts to remain connected to the satellite network.

Starlink runs off of 100-240V, 50-60Hz. It draws up to 2 amps. Currently, Starlink does not offer a DC power supply for Starlink RV.

High Performance Starlink

The High Performance Starlink dish uses 110-150 watts on average. This includes the antenna, router, power supply, and cables.

When idle, High Performance uses about 45 watts.

High Performance runs off of 100-240V, 50-60Hz, and draws up to 4.5 amps.

Original (round) Starlink

The original, round Starlink dish uses 65-100 watts on average. Starlink didn’t publish the official specifications for the round dish, but I was able to estimate this amount based on my own experience and reports from other users.

Idle usage is between 40-60 watts.

The round dish runs off of 100-240V, 50-60Hz, and it is estimated to use up to about 5 amps.

Factors that affect power consumption

The amount of power that Starlink draws depends on many factors. For example, the Starlink dish will use additional power when it’s snowing. It will use less power when nobody is downloading or uploading anything.

Weather

Weather is the biggest factor to consider in terms of power consumption. During rain or snow, more transmitting and receiving power is required, so power usage can increase significantly. The dish will also automatically melt snow and ice, which uses even more power.

Network activity

Starlink is an antenna that receives and transmits data from satellites orbiting overhead. It takes more power to transmit data than to receive it. If you are uploading data, Starlink will use more power. If you are downloading, Starlink uses less power.

When there is no network activity (idle), Starlink still uses a bit of power, but it is significantly less than when you are downloading or uploading.

Obstructions

If you have trees or other obstructions that block the signal from the Starlink satellites, your Starlink will use more power as it tries to continually re-establish a connection with the satellites.

Related: Sleep Schedule Feature Added To Starlink App

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22 Comments
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Graham King
29 days ago

How much does it cost to run a starlink system per hour. 75 to 100 watts is stated however it does not give over what period this wattage is used ie ( per hour /per day).

Graham King
29 days ago

How much does it cost to run a starlink system per hour?

rocco
rocco
1 month ago

Thank you for so many ads blocking content, captchas and more.
After all who is here just seeking specific information.

eddie
eddie
1 month ago

Noah, 2A at 120V is 240W not 50-75W for the standard dish, right?

Don
Don
2 months ago

Can you turn it off when not using it (overnight)? Maybe save 1 kilowatt-hour per day for HP hardware?

Jenn
Jenn
27 days ago
Reply to  Noah Clarke

I’m on solar power. At times we turn it off completely will this cause a problem?

Carlos
Carlos
6 days ago
Reply to  Noah Clarke

On the Standard model, between 50 -75 is exactly 62.5 Watts x 24 hours = 1,5 kWh per day, on a off-grid cabin, thats huuuge. So, “I don’t think it would be worth being without internet overnight for the savings” on a sububurban home, got it, but your article begins with “If you plan to use Starlink for your RV or off-grid cabin”. Man, empathy please!

Jenn
Jenn
27 days ago
Reply to  Don

I use solar power. At certain times we turn it completely off for extended periods. Will this cause a negative impact?

Mark
Mark
2 months ago

Can you fit any more ads on this site? Won’t be back!

Sam lik
Sam lik
2 days ago
Reply to  Noah Clarke

Hey I have a friend that is a teacher in Ukraine. They’re often without power for the majority of the day with the time they do have power everything must’ve charged. I’m guess she’s at most 3 hours a day with power. I want to get her a starlink so she can conduct her lessons on line and a power stations that’s available for her to pick up which is 600-630w/h capacity and takes four hours to fully charge. I’m not a math or electric person so this stuff i beyond me. She’d need to use the power station to power her laptop for class possibly and lamp and the starlink. Is this a pipe dream idea or is it at All plausible ? Any suggestion or pointing me to the right resource would be extremely appreciated. I’m next to almost calling Elon for some advice. Ha thanks.

sam
sam
2 days ago
Reply to  Noah Clarke

So when the power station dies what happens to the starlink unit?

sam
sam
2 days ago
Reply to  Noah Clarke

Also, i she has a fuel generator as back up that is single phased with 220v (50hz) would that be too much ?